Mitsubishi Triton Absolute concept debuts
Posted On Mar 26 2019 | Upcoming Cars
Beefed-up Triton showed in Bangkok, with series production lined-up pending customer feedback. Just make the damn thing. Everybody might know the teaser from last week showing a preview of what looked to be a hardcore version of the latest Mitsubishi Triton. Well, here it is. It’s called the Triton Absolute concept. Mitsubishi Triton is making its debut at the 40th Bangkok International Motor Show, potentially previewing a hardcore variant of the Triton of the near future. As you can see, it features some very tasty off-road-ready enhancements to help boost its visual appeal and off-road performance. Mitsubishi Triton Some of the highlights include beefed-up body cladding which appears to be made from carbon fibre, with widened wheel arches to support heavy-duty off-road tyres. The lifted suspension is also implemented to raise the body by 50mm for better ground clearance, and Mitsubishi says the modified suspension also provides improved ride and handling. Mitsubishi Triton   Up on top, you may have noticed the duo of LED light bars mounted on a bespoke roof rack, with red reflectors added to the sides matching the front underside apron. There’s also an integrated cover assembly for the tray area and a matched rear bumper bar with a carbon fibre tailgate.  

Mitsubishi Motors Australia

Although it is just a concept at this stage, it may inspire a production version down the track. And judging by the popularity of more aggressive variants of today’s uses, such as the HiLux Rugged X and Ford Ranger Wildtrack and Colorado Z71, this could be a right path for Mitsubishi to follow. Mitsubishi Motors Australia CEO, John Signoriello, spoke about the concept in a statement, saying: “The Triton Absolute concept is more robust, dynamic and powerful. It demonstrates our commitment to exploring a vision of the future Triton that will deliver on our ‘engineered beyond tough’ commitment to the Triton series… While only a concept at this stage, we will assess the feedback from customers in Australia and overseas towards a more aggressive Triton which will guide the brand’s future product development.” V

SPECIFICATIONS-

It’s being said, No specifications have been confirmed, so we assume it’s powered by the usual 2.4-litre turbo-diesel four-cylinder engine that produces 133kW and 430Nm (in auto form). We’re also guessing it’s based on the flagship variant and comes with rear and centre diff locks and a drive mode select system, with low range.

TRANSMISSION-

Automatic Number of Speeds-6,

WHEELS AND TYRES

Alloy Safety, Security and Driver Assistance
  • Forward Collision Mitigation System (FCM) with pedestrian detection
  • Lane Departure Warning (LDW)
  • Blind Spot Warning (BSW)
  • Lane Change Assist (LCA)
  • Automatic High Beam (AHB)
  • Emergency Stop Signal function (ESS)
  • Brake Override System (BOS)
AIRBAGS
Driver & front passenger SRS airbags, Curtain SRS airbags, Driver knee airbag.
CHILD SAFETY
ISO-Fix child seat anchorage Child restraint top tether Childproof rear door locks Power window lock driver control – passenger windows  

What do you think of it? Would you like to see this beast hit showrooms?

According to Mitsubishi Motors Australia CEO John Signoriello, public feedback and interest in the Triton Absolute will play a role in determining whether the company can convince its global parent to make it a production reality. “It demonstrates our commitment to exploring a vision of the future Triton that will deliver on our ‘engineered beyond tough’ commitment to the Triton series – bold enough to be taken on even more adventurous treks to explore Australia’s rugged outback, which is one of Mitsubishi’s defining strengths,” he said. “While only a concept at this stage, we will assess the feedback from customers in Australia and overseas towards a more aggressive Triton which will guide the brand’s future product development.” While short on more details, the accompanying press release said the concept would be “showcased over the coming 12 months to gauge public interest and feedback”, so any real-world version is unlikely to lob until the middle of next year, at best.